Wage & Hour Litigation Blog

Category Archives: Misclassification/Exemptions

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NY DOL To Increase Salary Threshold for Exempt Employees

Posted in DOL Enforcement, Misclassification/Exemptions, State Laws/Claims

Authored by Robert S. Whitman and Howard M. Wexler

As we all know, the revisions to the FLSA’s “white collar” exemptions will take effect December 1 and will increase the salary level required for the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions to $913 per week (or $47,476 per year).  Avid wage and hour practitioners in New York have been waiting to … Continue Reading

Employers Should Not Retreat on Compliance Planning Despite Two-Pronged Attack on OT Rule

Posted in DOL Enforcement, Misclassification/Exemptions

Authored by Alex Passantino

Seyfarth Synopsis: Two lawsuits related to the Department of Labor’s revisions to the white-collar exemptions have been filed in East Texas.

The first lawsuit, citing (among other things) the severe impact the impending salary increase will have on state and local government budgets, was filed by the Attorneys General of Nevada, Texas, and 19 other … Continue Reading

In Final Exam, Court Rejects Hearst Interns’ Pay Claims

Posted in Misclassification/Exemptions, State Laws/Claims

Authored by Rob Whitman

Seyfarth Synopsis: Unpaid interns for Hearst magazines have been rebuffed again in their effort to be declared eligible to receive wages under the FLSA and the New York Labor Law.

In an August 24, 2016 ruling, Judge J. Paul Oetken of the Southern District of New York held that six interns, who worked for Marie … Continue Reading

SCOTUS Says DOL Needs to Explain Itself If It Wants Deference to its Regulations

Posted in DOL Enforcement, Misclassification/Exemptions, Overtime

Authored by Abigail Cahak

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Supreme Court dealt a blow to the Department of Labor’s rulemaking procedures, criticizing the agency for explicitly changing its long-standing treatment  of automobile service advisors as overtime exempt while saying “almost nothing” regarding the reasons for the abrupt change.

This week, the Supreme Court dealt a blow to the Department of Labor’s rulemaking … Continue Reading

Plaintiffs’ Bar Sets Sights on New Lawsuits Following DOL Rule Amendments

Posted in DOL Enforcement, Misclassification/Exemptions

Co-authored by Richard Alfred, Brett Bartlett, and Noah Finkel

The Department of Labor’s release of the new exemption regulations appears imminent. As we have reported in a number of posts, these new rules are expected to nearly double the minimum annual salary level required for employees under the administrative, executive, and professional exemptions (currently $23,660 to between … Continue Reading

Advising On Their Own: Financial Advisors’ Class Claims Defeated

Posted in Conditional Certification, Misclassification/Exemptions, Overtime, Rule 23 Certification, State Laws/Claims

Authored by Hillary J. Massey

Employers have a new tool for opposing conditional and class certification of overtime claims by financial advisors and other exempt employees—last week, a judge in the District of New Jersey denied conditional and class certification of such claims because the plaintiffs failed to show that common issues predominated. The court, pointing to other decisions denying … Continue Reading

Gawker Victory Against Unpaid Interns Provides Helpful Roadmap

Posted in Misclassification/Exemptions

Co-authored by Rob Whitman, Adam Smiley, and Nadia Bandukda

A federal judge has sided with Gawker in the media company’s legal battle with a former unpaid intern who claimed that he should have been compensated as an employee. On March 29th, Judge Alison Nathan in the Southern District of New York granted Gawker’s motion for summary judgment and … Continue Reading

Classifying a Loan Underwriter as Exempt Is a Risk Worth Taking, Says Sixth Circuit

Posted in Misclassification/Exemptions

Co-authored by Noah A. Finkel and Abad Lopez

The demise of bank loan underwriters’ exempt status has been greatly exaggerated—at least according to a recent Sixth Circuit decision upholding the dismissal of a putative collective action against Huntington Bank. The court disagreed with underwriters who alleged that they were improperly classified as exempt and thereby wrongfully denied overtime pay. Instead, … Continue Reading

Closure For Second Circuit Intern Case, But Risks Persist Nationally

Posted in Misclassification/Exemptions

Co-authored by Robert Whitman and Adam Smiley

Spring is around the corner, with summer not far behind, so thoughts naturally turn to the obvious topic: internships.

Although the volume of new lawsuits by unpaid interns challenging their status has abated significantly since the Second Circuit issued its decision in July 2015 announcing a new legal standard and rejecting the Department … Continue Reading

Meowing Dogs and Barking Cats: Supreme Court’s Grant of Cert on Exempt Status of Automobile Service Advisors May Result in Reminder that Exemptions Are Functional and Flexible

Posted in Misclassification/Exemptions

Co-authored by Kara Goodwin and Noah Finkel

The U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed to resolve the question of whether “service advisors” at car dealerships—workers whose primary job responsibilities involve identifying service needs and selling service solutions to the dealership’s customers—are exempt from the Fair Labor Standard Act’s (“FLSA”) overtime pay requirements. Although the case involves a somewhat-discrete exemption that has … Continue Reading