Capitol HillAuthored by Alex Passantino

As the nation waited for the final states to be called in the early morning hours on Wednesday, we here at the Wage & Hour Litigation Blog focused on our one thing:  what impact would the result have on the DOL’s overtime exemption regulations scheduled to go into effect on December

Authored by Abigail Cahak

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Supreme Court dealt a blow to the Department of Labor’s rulemaking procedures, criticizing the agency for explicitly changing its long-standing treatment  of automobile service advisors as overtime exempt while saying “almost nothing” regarding the reasons for the abrupt change.

This week, the Supreme Court dealt a blow to

Authored by Alex Passantino

Tomorrow, the Department of Labor’s long-awaited revisions to the Fair Labor Standards Act’s white collar exemption will be announced. Although there certainly will be additional nuance identified once the entire package has been made available, here are the bottom line changes:

  • The new salary level required for the executive, administrative, and

Authored by Hillary J. Massey

Employers have a new tool for opposing conditional and class certification of overtime claims by financial advisors and other exempt employees—last week, a judge in the District of New Jersey denied conditional and class certification of such claims because the plaintiffs failed to show that common issues predominated. The court,

Authored by Alex Passantino

The Department of Labor has submitted the final overtime rule to OMB for review. Typically, OMB review takes 30 to 60 days. Last year, OMB reviewed the proposed rule for just about 60 days before approving it. On this timetable, DOL is looking at the possibility of a May date for

Co-authored by Steve Shardonofsky and Ashley Hymel

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit recently sided with an ever-increasing line of cases clarifying the type of payments that may be added to a fixed salary without violating the fluctuating workweek method described in 29 C.F.R § 778.114.  The Court distinguished additional hourly-based pay

As our readers know, the laws regarding how, and how much, employers must pay their employees are rapidly evolving. Against this backdrop, we are excited to announce Five on Friday, a new micro-blog series developed by Seyfarth’s Wage & Hour Litigation Practice Group.

Each installment in this weekly series will feature a skilled lawyer

Authored by Alex Passantino

‘Twas the week before Christmas, 2-0-1-5
When the poetry elves on the blog came alive.
Crafting their rhymes with a purpose so clear:
Presenting the wage-hour gems of the year.

In January, for new regs in this year our breath bated.
Then for six painful months, we speculated and

sealCo-authored by Laura E. Reasons and Noah A. Finkel

BlackBerry devices may be a thing of the past; but smartphones–and their ability to allow employees to be constantly connected–certainly aren’t going away any time soon.

On Thursday, a judge in the Northern District of Illinois held in Allen v. City of Chicago that the Chicago