Authored by Cheryl Luce

Seyfarth Synopsis:  If it becomes law, a new bill will expand the FLSA’s tip provisions into areas traditionally regulated by state law and create new areas of ambiguity that could be a breeding ground for yet more wage-hour litigation.

We have been covering the saga of a controversial 2011 DOL regulation that gave employees the right to receive tips even when they were paid the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. As courts agreed again and again, the rule was contrary to the FLSA’s plain language and inconsistent with its remedies. In late 2017, the DOL proposed to rescind the rule, noting concerns about its scope. But that proposal has been highly politicized and labeled an attack on workers, authorizing employers to pocket employees’ tips (even though federal law never regulated an employee’s right to receipt of tips, even before the rule).

Ultimately, the fallout around the DOL’s 2017 proposal has resulted in a proposed law amending the FLSA called the Tip Income Protection Act of 2018, announced in principle on March 6, 2018 and receiving bipartisan support in Congress as well as from Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta. The bill has been added to the omnibus budget spending bill that the House passed yesterday and the Senate passed this morning. (The Tip Income Protection Act’s text begins on page 2,025 of the bill.) Barring a presidential veto, the bill will become law.

The Tip Income Protection Act amends the FLSA by adding a provision to 29 U.S.C. § 203(m) that states:

An employer may not keep tips received by its employees for any purpose, including allowing managers or supervisors to keep any portion of employees’ tips, regardless of whether or not the employer takes a tip credit.

The Act further creates a remedy for violating this provision “in the amount of the sum of any tip credit taken by the employer and all such tips unlawfully kept by the employer, and an additional equal amount in damages” and imposes a civil penalty of up to $1,000 for each violation.

As currently written, § 203(m) only regulates tips when the employer has taken a tip credit against its minimum wage obligations, and the FLSA only provides a remedy for the unpaid minimum wage (not for the amount of the tips retained). The Tip Income Protection Act thus expands the FLSA’s tipping provisions from ensuring tipped employees are properly notified of any tip credits and paid minimum wage to guaranteeing that employees are paid the tips they receive in full.

The proposed Tip Income Protection Act is a major deviation from the FLSA’s core purpose. Since its enactment in 1936, that purpose has been to: (i) ensure that all employees are paid at least the federal minimum wage, (ii) ensure that employees are paid at a rate of at least 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek, unless an exemption applies, and (iii) prohibit unlawful child labor. Never has it been the FLSA’s aim to ensure that employees are paid all of their wages. That historically has been left to the states. Indeed, if an employee makes at least the minimum wage and overtime according to the FLSA’s requirements, the FLSA can provide no further relief. The FLSA’s monetary remedies are currently limited to “unpaid minimum wages, or their unpaid overtime compensation, as the case may be, and in an additional equal amount as liquidated damages.” 29 U.S.C. § 216(b). By allowing employees to recover the full amount of tips, the Tip Income Protection Act represents a major departure from the purposes of the FLSA.

Perhaps the bigger concern with the Tip Income Protection Act as written is that it is vague and will leave employers scrambling to understand how the new law applies to them. First, the bill states “managers and supervisors” are prohibited from sharing any portion of employees’ tips and thus cannot participate in a tip pool. But the bill does not define “managers and supervisors,” and there are various ways in which these terms are interpreted in different contexts: does a lead bartender who can’t hire or fire employees, but serves as a manager-on-duty when the owner is not around and who also primarily serves customers, get to share in the tip pool? when he is acting as a manager? or never? Additionally, the bill selects the ambiguous word “to keep” as the operative commanding verb. Restaurants and their agents are not allowed “to keep” employees’ tips. Is “keeping” tips limited to circumstances in which the employer actually uses the tips for its own purposes? Or would it also apply to the distribution of tips to other employees, as appears to be the case for tips distributed to “managers and supervisors”? Would “improper” tip pools be subject to the new standard or the old one?

The Tip Income Protection Act appears to respond to fears that no federal regulation of tips opens the floodgate to pocketing employee tips. But tips have and will continue to be regulated by state law; indeed, federal law has never regulated wage payment generally and the source of that protection has been state laws. Although its sponsors are characterizing the bill as restoring a right for employees that was created by the Obama DOL, that right never existed in federal law (and apparently has not needed to exist in federal law until now). It only existed in the form of an administrative rule that exceeded agency authority and was largely rejected by courts.

Finally, the bill appears not to disturb the DOL regulations’ definition of a tip and guidance that “a compulsory charge for service, such as 15 percent of the amount of the bill, imposed on a customer by an employer’s establishment, is not a tip.” 29 C.F.R. § 531.55. No new definition of “tip” would be added to the FLSA as a result of the bill, and service charges should be spared from the bill’s new rules.

Co-authored by Howard M. Wexler and Robert S. Whitman

Seyfarth Synopsis: Governor Andrew Cuomo has directed the Commissioner of Labor to schedule public hearings to address the possibility of eliminating the tip credit. A tip credit allows an employer to pay less than minimum wage to employees who receive the bulk of their pay in customer tips.

As we say goodbye to 2017, New York employers should also start preparing to say goodbye to minimum wage tip credits.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has directed the Commissioner of Labor to schedule public hearings to address the possibility of eliminating the tip credit. A tip credit allows an employer to pay less than minimum wage to employees who receive the bulk of their pay in customer tips.

As we reported in 2015, the then-Commissioner issued a report questioning the continuation of the minimum wage tip credit. Governor Cuomo appears to be in favor of the elimination of tip credits; he called for the public hearings “to ensure that no workers are more susceptible to exploitation because they rely on tips to survive.” While the Governor has not made any specific proposal, it is likely that, even if the tip credit goes away, employees could still be tipped, and participate in tip pooling/sharing arrangements, but they would have to be paid at least the standard minimum wage that non-tipped employees receive.

As with the minimum wage for all employees across the state, the minimum wage for tipped employees across the state is set to increase on December 31. The Department of Labor has summarized the revisions applicable to the tipped minimum wage for hospitality employers, employers in “miscellaneous industries,” and employers in the “building service industry.” Employers should consult these summaries to determine how much they can deduct for the appropriate minimum wage tip credit as the amount varies based on the industry, job classification, location of the employee and size of the employer.

Authored by Cheryl Luce

Seyfarth Synopsis: Tipped workers who didn’t receive notice of the tip credit get a win under New York state minimum wage law in a case that echoes technical traps we have seen in FLSA decisions.

Throughout the year, we have been covering cases that show how the FLSA has been construed by courts as “remedial and humanitarian” in purpose, but that its technical traps do not always serve such a purpose and do not necessarily serve to ensure a living wage for working Americans. A recent decision from a New York federal court applying New York law shows how state minimum wage laws can also provide traps for the unwary and result in big payouts to employees who were paid at least minimum wage but in a way that violates the law’s technical requirements.

This case was filed five years ago against a restaurant company operating franchises in New York. The plaintiffs moved for partial summary judgment on whether they were properly advised in writing about tip credits when they started at the company and whether their wage statements met New York state law requirements. The moving plaintiffs were paid $5.00 per hour in regular pay and $7.50 per hour in overtime in addition to tips that (at least for the purposes of summary judgment) the plaintiffs did not dispute brought their pay above New York’s minimum wage requirements, nor did they contend that they did not understand that they were paid pursuant to the tip credit. Nonetheless, because of the company’s technical tip credit notice and wage statement violations, the court concluded that the company was liable to 15,000 workers for the liability period of 2011 to present for the difference between their hourly rate and the New York minimum wage (which increased to $9.70 per hour on December 31, 2016).

According to reporting by Law360, the plaintiffs’ attorney estimates that the damages could lead to more than $100 million in payments to the workers. It is not hard to imagine that such a massive judgment could put a major strain on the company’s operations or even threaten their ability to continue doing business. All the while, the plaintiffs did not dispute that, accounting for their tips, they were actually paid at least the New York minimum wage. In the event that the court orders defendants to pay them difference in the hourly rate they were paid and the New York minimum wage, they will have received the benefit of not just tips, but also damages resulting from what can only be described as a technicality.

Although this is a state law case and thus does not make up the fabric of inconsistent and illogical rhetoric we find in FLSA decisions that we have examined earlier, we find it appropriate to draw similar conclusions here. What is remedial and humanitarian about this court’s construction of New York’s minimum wage requirements? What protection of the right to earn a living wage is afforded low wage workers in this case? And if the answer is none, then perhaps courts ought to acknowledge that they do not always construe wage-hour laws in a way that achieves their core purpose of ensuring a living wage for working Americans, but rather in a way that has no apparent connection to such a purpose.

Authored By Alex Passantino

As we’ve reported previously, among the items the Department of Labor identified earlier this year in its Regulatory Agenda was a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) seeking to rescind portions of a 2011 rule that restricted tip pooling for employers who do not use the tip credit to satisfy their minimum wage obligations. On October 24, 2017, that NPRM was sent to the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and approval. One of the cases challenging the validity of the 2011 rulemaking may be on its way to the Supreme Court, with the Administration’s response to a cert petition due on November 7. With that deadline looming, it’s possible that the Administration is seeking to moot the issue before the Supreme Court has the chance to address some of the issues related to agency deference.

After OIRA clears the NPRM, it will be sent to the Federal Register for the public to provide comments in response to the Department’s proposal. At that time, we’ll know the specifics of the proposal and will be able to provide more guidance on what this means for employers. Stay tuned.

 

Authored by Alex Passantino

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Wage & Hour Division announced its regulatory plan for the next year and it is less ambitious than some may have anticipated.  A request for information on the overtime rule and a proposal to rescind a limited tip credit regulation are all that is on the immediate horizon for employers.

Each spring and fall, Washington waits with bated breath as the Executive Branch releases its regulatory agenda. As the first pronouncement of some of the specifics of the Trump Administration’s regulatory plans, this year’s agenda was anticipated more than most. And now we have it

The Wage and Hour Division’s initial plans include the announced Request for Information on the white collar exemptions, which is expected to be published this month. An as-of-yet-unannounced action, however, is a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that would rescind aspects of the Department’s 2011 rule related to tipped employees. Specifically, the NPRM would seek comment on the Department’s proposal to rescind the portion of the rule that restricts tip pooling for employers who do not use the tip credit to satisfy their minimum wage obligations. That rule has been the subject of much litigation, with mixed results. One of the cases may be on its way to the Supreme Court, with the Administration’s response to a cert petition due on September 8. With the NPRM slated for an August publication, it’s possible that the Administration may be seeking to avoid review by the Supreme Court on some of the touchier issues related to the proper deference a federal agency should be afforded. We’ll keep you posted.

Finally, WHD has identified a long-term plan to revisit the Section 14(c) program. Section 14(c) of the FLSA permits, under certain circumstances, employment of individuals with disabilities at subminimum wages. It is a politically sensitive program, and one in need of updating. No timetable has been provided for the Department’s review.

Authored by Alex Passantino

As we blogged last year, the President’s Executive Order establishing a minimum wage for certain federal contractor employees requires that the minimum wage be adjusted on an annual basis. In the September 16, 2015 Federal Register, the Department of Labor’s Wage & Hour Division will announce that the wage rate will increase from $10.10 per hour to $10.15 per hour. The minimum cash wage for covered tipped employees will increase from $4.90 per hour to $5.85 per hour.

Workers performing on or in connection with covered contracts must be paid these new rates beginning January 1, 2016. We discussed many of the applicable definitions and coverage issues in our prior coverage.