AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion

Co-authored by Colleen Regan and David Kadue

Gentry is dead.  Back in 2007, the California Supreme Court, in Gentry v. Superior Court held that California public policy favoring class actions was so important that employers cannot have employees, in arbitration agreements, waive their right to pursue a class action.  Many thought that the Gentry rule

Co-authored by Christina F. Jackson and Julie G. Yap

While employers have been waiting patiently for the California Supreme Court’s decision regarding the enforceability of class and representative action waivers in arbitration agreements, last week, a California federal court jumped into the fray and held that state law rules are powerless against the broad

Authored by Jim Harris

The California Supreme Court heard oral argument in two important cases involving employment-related class actions.  From the tenor of and comments made at the argument, it appears likely that the ultimate results will be a mixed bag for employers.

The first case, Iskanian v. CLS Transportation of Los Angeles, LLC,

California Flag.bmpBy Julie Yap and Brandon McKelvey

As this blog recently covered, in September the California Supreme Court granted review in Iskanian v. CLS Transportation Los Angeles, LLC to decide whether class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements are enforceable under California law.  This week, another Court of Appeal added its opinion on this issue

Mass.jpgCo-authored by Richard Alfred and James Hlawek

A Massachusetts Superior Court judge recently invalidated an arbitration class action waiver, even though the U.S. Supreme Court found in its AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion ruling earlier this year that federal law preempts state laws that interfere with an employer’s ability to enforce arbitration agreements with class