Arbitration Agreements

By: Ryan McCoy

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”) exempts workers engaged in interstate commerce from enforcement of mandatory arbitration agreements. Uber drivers (and other drivers working in the gig economy) have frequently argued that they fit under this “interstate transportation” exemption in order to avoid arbitration of their claim that they have been misclassified as independent contractors. A
Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Rules Uber Drivers Must Arbitrate Classification Claims Because They Are Not Interstate Transportation Workers

By: John Yslas

Arbitration agreement resolution of commercial disputes on a desk.

Seyfarth Synopsis: In vetoing the California Legislature’s attempt to criminalize arbitration agreements (AB 3080), Governor Brown displayed common sense and the legal learning provided by recent U.S. Supreme Court authority.

Haven’t high courts already upheld mandatory arbitration agreements?

Yes, they have. The California
Continue Reading Governor Brown Vetoes Legislative Attempt to Criminalize Mandatory Arbitration

By: Noah A. Finkel, David S. Baffa, Daniel C. Whang, and Andrew L. Scroggins

Seyfarth Synopsis:  In one of the most significant employment cases in memory, a sharply divided United States Supreme Court held today that employers may require employees, as a condition of employment, to enter into arbitration agreements that contain waivers of the ability to
Continue Reading A Class Waiver Can Be A Condition of Employment

By: John Phillips and Steve Shardonofsky

Seyfarth Synopsis: In an important decision for employers seeking to enforce arbitration agreements and limit wage and hour exposure and related defense costs, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit reaffirmed that district courts should rule on motions to compel arbitration and related jurisdictional questions before reaching issues on FLSA conditional certification. 
Continue Reading Fifth Circuit Keeps the Horse Before the Cart: Arbitration to be Decided Before Conditional Certification

By: Noah A. Finkel and Andrew L. Scroggins

Seyfarth SynopsisPending bi-partisan legislation aimed at preventing employers from enforcing arbitration agreements of sexual harassment claims might make employers unable to enforce arbitration agreements, and class waivers included in them, as to any employment claim.

High profile stories of sexual harassment (and much worse) in the workplace and beyond have
Continue Reading SLOW DOWN Congress: You Are About to Render the FAA Inapplicable to Employment Disputes (and Class Waivers), and You Probably Don’t Realize It

Authored by Andrew L. Scroggins, Noah A. Finkel, and David S. Baffa

Seyfarth Synopsis:  The NLRB has withdrawn the significant concession it offered at oral argument on the nature of the NLRA rights it seeks to assert in the face of employers’ mandatory arbitration programs.

As noted in our earlier blog post, the Supreme Court heard oral
Continue Reading NLRB About-Face Highlights Lack of Reasoning on the Class Action “Right” It Seeks to Assert

Co-authored by Noah A. Finkel, David S. Baffa, and Andrew L. Scroggins

Seyfarth Synopsis: Following oral argument, employers should be cautiously optimistic that the Supreme Court will allow mandatory arbitration programs containing waivers of the ability to bring collective and class actions.

In yesterday’s oral argument, in one of the most significant employment law cases we have seen
Continue Reading Class Waivers at the Divided Supreme Court: Employers Cautiously Optimistic

Co-authored by Noah Finkel and David Baffa

Seyfarth Synopsis: In the first argument of the first day of its new term, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument in three cases presenting the issue of whether an employer may require employees to enter into arbitration agreements containing a waiver of the ability to join a class or collective action.
Continue Reading Will the Supreme Court Finally Remove Doubt That an Employer Can Mandate That Employees Enter Into Arbitration Agreements with Class Waivers?

Authored by Holger G. Besch 

Perhaps signaling the importance of the issue for American businesses and jurisprudence, the U.S. Supreme Court‎ chose the first day of its term beginning in October as the date to set oral arguments in three petitions for certiorari asking whether employees can be required to waive their rights via arbitration agreements to file class and
Continue Reading SCOTUS Puts the Class Action Waiver Issue at the Top of Its Agenda

Co-authored by Robert S. Whitman and Howard M. Wexler

Seyfarth Synopsis: A New York intermediate appellate court with jurisdiction over Manhattan weighed in on the enforceability of arbitration agreements with class and collective action waivers.  Its decision, issued on July 18, 2017, holds that waivers are unenforceable as they interfere with employees’ rights under the National Labor Relations Act
Continue Reading New York Appellate Court Strikes Down Class Action Waivers