independent contractors

Co-authored by Christopher Truxler and Coby Turner

Seyfarth Synopsis: Earlier this month, a California federal court dismissed the misclassification claims of 7-Eleven franchisees on the pleadings, finding they did not and could not plead facts sufficient to show that they were employees of their franchisor.

All is well with one of America’s most beloved convenience

Co-authored by: Steve Shardonofsky and John P. Phillips

Seyfarth Synopsis: On November 7, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Save Local Businesses Act. If passed by the Senate, the bill would overturn Obama-era decisions and agency guidance broadly defining and holding separate, unrelated companies liable as “joint employers” under federal wage & hour

Authored by Alex Passantino

On June 7, Department of Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta announced the withdrawal of the DOLs 2015 and 2016 Administrator Interpretations (AIs) on joint employment and independent contractors. These documents were statements of the Wage & Hour Division’s interpretations of the FLSAs (and Migrant

Authored by Cheryl A. Luce

Seyfarth Synopsis: On May 25, 2017, Noah Finkel spoke at our full-day summit about what to expect from the DOL under the new administration. Noah’s forecast: “They say that the policy is the people, and we don’t yet have the people.” We have a Secretary of Labor and an interim

Co-authored by Brett Bartlett and Kevin Young

Seyfarth Synopsis:  Last Thursday, the Senate confirmed Alexander Acosta as the 27th United States Secretary of Labor. Filling the final post in President Trump’s cabinet, Acosta will lead a Department of Labor that has, since inauguration, operated without political leadership in the Secretary role. With Secretary Acosta

Authored by Hillary J. Massey

Seyfarth Synopsis: It remains to be seen whether the Trump administration will redirect its enforcement priorities away from independent contractor misclassification issues or curtail the applicable standards in the coming years. Because states and plaintiffs’ attorneys likely will continue to aggressively pursue independent contractor matters, employers should consider auditing their

Seyfarth Synopsis: The New York Court of Appeals recently rejected the narrow view of the Unemployment Insurance Appeal Board and found that substantial evidence did not support a finding that certain yoga instructors were misclassified as independent contractors.

Co-authored by Robert S. Whitman and Howard M. Wexler

As wage and hour “gurus” are aware, the