California Court of Appeals

California Flag.bmpBy Julie Yap and Brandon McKelvey

As this blog recently covered, in September the California Supreme Court granted review in Iskanian v. CLS Transportation Los Angeles, LLC to decide whether class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements are enforceable under California law.  This week, another Court of Appeal added its opinion on this issue

California Flag.bmpBy Brandon R. McKelvey, Chantelle C. Egan, and Michael A. Wahlander

Last week, the California Supreme Court agreed to decide whether class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements are enforceable under California law.  In Iskanian v. CLS Transportation Los Angeles, LLC, the Court of Appeal held that a class action waiver in an

California Court of Appeals Seal2.pngCo-authored by George Preonas and Hayley Macon

On July 23, 2012, in Harris v. Superior Court (Liberty Mutual Ins. Co.), a case that the California Supreme Court previously had reversed and remanded, the California Court of Appeal stuck by its prior conclusion and held that insurance claims adjusters do not qualify for the administrative

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Co-Authored by: Jeffrey A. Berman and Anthony J. Musante

On July 2, 2012, the California Court of Appeal affirmed a trial court ruling denying class certification to a group of newspaper carriers claiming they were misclassified as independent contractors.  In Sotelo v. Medianews Group, Inc., the Court of Appeal concluded that plaintiffs’  proposed class

3-21 Blog.bmpAuthored by Laura Reathaford and Catherine Dacre

Plaintiffs often argue in seeking class certification that an employer’s policy applicable to all or a certain group of employees provides sufficient evidence of commonality to justify the certification of the alleged class.  In Delodder v. Aerotek, Inc., the Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision denying

California%20Court%20of%20Appeals%20Seal2.pngCo-authored by Tim Nelson and Brandon McKelvey

The California Court of Appeal has issued a published decision holding that denial of class certification in one lawsuit may not prevent similar class action claims in a later lawsuit.  On January 18, 2012, in Bridgeford v. Pacific Health Corporation, the court expressly disagreed with a prior