By: Louisa J. Johnson

Today marks two additional efforts by President Biden’s Administration to reverse the Trump Administration’s rulemaking. This time, two U.S. Department of Labor rules that were both published in the Federal Register as final rules before President Biden’s inauguration are in the crosshairs. One of the rules concerns when a company might

By: Christina Jaremus, Kyle Petersen, Daniel Small, and Gena Usenheimer

Seyfarth Synopsis: The COVID-19 pandemic thrust remote working upon many employers without notice or adequate time to prepare. Now that employees are settling into longer-term remote working arrangements, employers are increasingly confronted with questions regarding their expense reimbursement obligations. Employers are

By: Ryan McCoy

Seyfarth Synopsis: Following the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s determination in December 2018 that federal law preempts California’s meal and rest break rules, observers questioned whether California courts would find that the preemption was valid.  Shortly after the determination was issued, the State of California and several other groups appealed directly to

By: Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Alex S. Oxyer

Seyfarth Synopsis: Incentive awards for class representatives are impermissible, according to a ground-breaking decision last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.  Though not an employment case, the decision is a must-read for class action practitioners handling all varieties of workplace class

By: Molly Gabel and Samuel Rubinstein

Seyfarth Synopsis: Over a year since it was introduced, the New York State Senate and Assembly recently passed the Healthy Terminals Act.  The Act, among other things, gives the government the authority to set prevailing wages and overtime rates for covered airport workers.  At this time, it is unclear

By: Louisa Johnson and Kerry Friedrichs

Seyfarth Synopsis: In its first published ruling on such issues, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit disagreed with some earlier court rulings and, in keeping with the U.S. Department of Labor’s new interpretive rule (taking effect on August 7, 2020), held that the fluctuating workweek

By: John G. Yslas and Phillip J. Ebsworth 

Seyfarth Synopsis: In acquiring a company in bankruptcy, there is often a tendency to think this guarantees the purchaser will be “free and clear” of any liability (including so-called “successor liability”).  This is not necessarily so with wage and hour liability, particularly if the purchaser merely